Lyme: Herxing & Detoxing

I want to share a good resource I found that covers various options for detox support during a Herx Reaction (aka “die off” – when the Lyme is being killed off, it creates toxins and your body can’t get rid of them fast enough, making you feel flu-y and absolutely horrible).

The past couple weeks I have been having intense Die Off symptoms from taking Byron White’s AL Complex. Usually die off comes during the start of a new supplement, but I’ve been on this Lyme treatment for months, so it caught me completely off guard. Herx symptoms can be very hard to differentiate from Lyme symptoms, as they are basically the same for me: intense fatigue, muscle and joint aches, insane brain fog (I have felt like a complete moron lately and can’t think straight), eczema, anxiety, digestiion issues, increased tinnitus, to name a few – so it took me several days to figure out it was die off rather than a return of symptoms. However, when I upped my detoxing regimen and stopped the AL Complex, the symptoms subsided, and I knew it is a Herx.

When experiencing a Herx Reaction, it’s crucial to do as much as possible to help your body detox. However, when you have brain fog, it’s easy to forget all the tricks, but I found a great list of options here:

http://www.tiredoflyme.com/detox-methods.html

And here is some more info on detoxing in general (sometimes too much can make you feel bad too – it’s a balance!) http://www.tiredoflyme.com/4-reasons-why-you-still-feel-bad-despite-detoxing.html

I have had good success with a combination of Activated Charcoal (at least 1 hour away from meds and food because it absorbs all nutrients, bad and good), skin brushing, upping water intake (with lemon), Alka Seltzer Gold, hot epsom salt baths, Glutathion (S-Acetyl form), occasional sauna use, eating a clean, inflammatory diet (which is a modified version of Paleo for me), supporting digestion with digestive enzyme and probiotics, making sure my digestive tract is working efficiently and eliminating waste using a combo of Magnesium citrate, Aloe capsules and Slippery Elm, and getting PLENTY of rest. My doctor also recommended Burbur, which I am going to give a go.

Time for a nap now. Apologies for any grammar and spelling errors – blame the brain fog! (which I just typed as “gof”)

I’d love to hear of any detox methods you find helpful, and would also love to learn more about juicing.

The Good Things in Life (knitting, moms, ponies, sunshine & coconut milk ice cream)

Double Chocolate Ice Cream with Peanut Butter Swirl

Wow, has it been a few weeks since I posted?! I have a huge backlog of gluten free recipes that I want to post… unfortunately they are all stored in my mind or scrawled on scraps of paper, instead of … Continue reading

Welcome to MY SLEEPY KITCHEN!

Welcome to my sleepy kitchen, a blog about a wheat lover’s adventures in gluten free and whole foods cooking. In 2011 I decided to go gluten free and use nutrition as a tool to help me overcome Chronic Fatigue. Though mainly featuring gluten free recipes, my sleepy kitchen also includes information I’ve accumulated on how to beat fatigue and live a healthier life. The idea of life without wheat was once my worst nightmare, but with a little research and the help of my husband Gary, our library of trusty cookbooks and my new best friends, rice & gluten free oats, I have come to realize that gluten isn’t necessary to make amazing food! There are so many great gluten free blogs out there – this is my spin on delicious & nutritious gluten free cooking.

Photo: Amy Poole

One year ago, I became very ill with Chronic Fatigue (aka CFS, ME/Myalgic encephalomyelitis, Post Viral Fatigue/PVF – call it what you will!) and life as I knew it came grinding to a halt. Luckily, now I am on the road to recovery, and I credit a large part of my success to a gluten free, whole foods diet; as I started to recover, I began cooking a lot in my free time and began to accumulate a large store of gluten free recipes. In the past year I have collected an incredible amount of information about nutrition and CFS, so I decided to start this blog to share this knowledge with others experience similar problems  –  and anyone interested in trying some new recipes!

While there are numerous blogs related to gluten free cooking,  I have not found many blogs that specifically address CFS. I was shocked to discover this; there are so many people suffering from CFS, yet there is very little helpful information available on the web, and only a handful of doctors take the illness as seriously as it should be or provide useful information on how to get better (aside from “just rest”). Luckily, I have been able to build myself an amazing support team of family, friends and holistically minded health care practitioners who have helped me get through the hardest year of my life; it’s been an incredibly tough journey, but I have learned so much about myself and my physical & emotional health this past year, and I am in a much happier place than I was before this all happened. I’d estimate I’ve recovered about 65-70%, which I am really proud of – considering I felt like I was functioning at around 35% when I first became ill and only operating at 90% for a few years before this all happened. I won’t ramble on here, but if you are interested, read more about me, overcoming CFS and this blog in the About section.

Next up… my first recipe post!